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The National Museum of African American History and Culture and its opening events have attracted worldwide attention
One of the Johnson family photographs taken at the beach was selected by the National Museum of African American History and Culture for its “Power of Place” exhibit.
The Eastville Community Historical Society’s headquarters and museum are in a house donated by Lippman Johnson and Rose Johnson, above, along with a trove of other photographs of his family.
Georgette Grier-Key, the executive director and curator of the Eastville Community Historical Society, attended a museum preview earlier this month, pausing for a photograph next to Chuck Berry’s car.
Frank Hunter was one of the first African-American chief petty officers in the Navy. His commanding officer recommended him for a Medal of Honor for his attempt to save a fellow shipmate.
Frank Hunter’s great-grandson, Franklin Wilks, was at the opening and dedication of the museum last weekend. He has requested that the Navy give his ancestor the Medal of Honor posthumously.
In addition to his great-grandfather’s photograph, Mr. Wilks also gave the museum his continuous record of service, which documents his activities through all of his years of active duty.


The Suffolk County Water Authority's base in East Hampton Taylor K. Vecsey

Aubrey Peterson, an East Hampton Middle School eighth grader, outside the Union League Club in Manhattan on Monday morning Susan Peterson



After making their own pinwheels during classes this week using paper and green drinking straws, students held them high on Friday to celebrate International Peace Day at the school's ninth "Pinwheels for Peace" event. Morgan McGivern photos
Holding their handmade pinwheels, hundreds of students at the John M. Marshall Elementary School formed a giant peace sign on the field outside the school.
In her remarks, Beth Doyle, the school principal, related world peace to the concept of the "Golden Rule," the idea that people should treat others the way they themselves would like to be treated.
Students sang songs about peace they learned during class as part of their celebration of International Peace Day on Friday morning.
Gregory Butler, the John M. Marshall music teacher, led students in song on Friday.

White Sands Motel after Hurricane Sandy David E. Rattray

Christine Sampson

In workshops, residents roll up sleeves, hoping to shape future development
In one of a series of meetings in Montauk last week, planners consulting with the town on a hamlet study focusing on commercial properties gathered to study maps and come up with priorities for the future of the hamlet’s downtown and dock areas. Joanne Pilgrim