Books

A thorough and thoroughly engrossing guide to the 17th-century twists and turns that established the reigning British family’s unbroken line over the last 300-plus years.
Read in our often bewildering #MeToo world, Meg Wolitzer’s “The Female Persuasion” is an almost prophetic tale of gender and power, shaped by a sustained inquiry into relationships.
Chris Knopf’s latest mystery involves the clubbing death of a deep-undercover intelligence operative, black-jumpsuited ninja types, and the fine cabinetry and company of one Sam Acquillo.

Reading Martin Amis’s new nonfiction collection, “The Rub of Time,” you almost wish he wasn’t so proficient a fiction writer, and a world-class one at that. Success has thinned Mr. Amis’s need for grunt work.
Alafair Burke’s “The Wife” asks a worrying question: If you suffer through a traumatic event, do you recover? Or do you just think you have recovered?
A.J. Jacobs confirms the beguiling promise of ancestry-hunting: to construct a narrative for yourself that is more interesting than the one you’ve got.
How do you figure out what comes next after what gave your life meaning is gone?

Philip Schultz’s new collection of poems, though steeped in loss, may well provide you with all you need to rise above pain and despondency.

If there is a barometer for pints of blood loss in books on crime, Kerriann Flanagan Brosky has chosen a wide range of felonious activity — horrifying to mundane. The mercury level is in the middle.
The Star welcomes submissions of essays for its “Guestwords” column of between 700 and 1,200 words. Submissions can be sent for review by email, in text or Word format, to submissions@ehstar.com.

Pushcart calls itself the “best of the small presses,” but its mission is large, and the big, meaningful questions humanity must ask can be found inside.
BookEnds — a workshop established by Susan Scarf Merrell and Meg Wolitzer of Stony Brook Southampton’s M.F.A. program in creative writing.

“Lioness: Golda Meir and the Nation of Israel” is the monumental result of Francine Klagsbrun's decade-long effort to understand the woman who became prime minister.