During the last few weeks as the season has slipped from summer to autumn two shrubs have captured my attention and captivated my fancy.
It’s been readily apparent that some crape myrtles here were badly damaged by two brutal winters, while others escaped seemingly unscathed. That raises questions. Which ones are most adaptable to the East End, and under what conditions?
Before summer slips away and while our memories are fresh, it’s a good idea to take note of the winners, sinners, and those we’re not sure about in this year’s gardens.
Small-flowered clematis are one of the great pleasures of the summer garden. They flower over an extended period, often from June into September.
Roses are undergoing what may be one of their most transformative changes since the first repeat-blooming flowers reached Europe from China about 250 years ago. That is a brash statement, I realize, but more true than not.
We gardeners take inspiration wherever we find it. Nature, other gardens, books, and magazines are the obvious places.
Planters filled with roses, succulents, thyme, and moss soaked up the steady drizzle on Saturday afternoon as attendees at the LongHouse Reserve assessed the creations while balancing umbrellas and ballots.
The Madoo Conservancy in Saga­ponack will hold its annual garden sale and celebration, Much Ado About Madoo, this weekend. The festivities begin tomorrow with a benefit cocktail preview party from 6 to 8 p.m.
Last summer I was obsessing over the purple-leaved redbud Cercis canadensis Forest Pansy. It had been planted in the early 1990s behind a large oak, and only glimpses of the foliage could be seen from the lawn and the house. It was perfect and charming.