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  • Posts and beams, roughly hewn some 500 years ago and showing adze strikes still, have a suitable new home, an unpretentious second home resembling a hunting lodge, what with its ample wood paneling, stuffed game birds, paintings of foxes and hounds and fly-fishing streams, fireplace just right for a curled-up English spaniel, and suggestive of cigars, snifters of brandy, long guns propped in a corner.
  • Collectors usually start small before letting loose their acquisitiveness. In an extreme example, one might begin with brick-size viewing stones — Japanese suiseki — that can look like tiny mountain ranges, perhaps paired with bonsai to make miniature landscapes, before moving on to larger stones, big enough to sit on, amid raked sand.

  • “Where Nobody
    Knows Your Name”
    John Feinstein
    Doubleday, $26.95

  • When Don Lenzer and Bettina Volz set out to renovate their aging quasi-saltbox in the almost rain forest-dense Amagansett woods north of Montauk Highway, a search led them across the country to a completely different landscape, the desert inferno of Phoenix, and a company called ASUL, which stands for Adaptable System for Universal Living.

  • Don’t let the summertime eruption of author appearances put a crimp in your listening style, bibliophiles, just pull up a (preferably reserved) chair and take in the Amagansett Library’s answer to such a series, won’t you? It’s called Authors After Hours, coming to you free on Saturdays at the shingled Main Street edifice, this week at 6 p.m. with Jenny Offill and her second novel, “Dept. of Speculation,” billed as a portrait of a marriage.

  • Dissatisfied with your commencement address? With the uninspiring words of the gray senator who sits on the obscure subcommittee? Or the earnestness of the heiress who funneled her wealth into some worthy but uninteresting nonprofit?

  • The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill is introducing a series of lunchtime talks called “Brain Food: Conversations on Art,” led by Alicia Longwell, the museum’s chief curator. Each talk promises an informal gathering where participants can listen to an hourlong illustrated lecture and conversation on the museum’s exhibitions, publications, and artists who have work in the collection.

  • In recent years Michael Shnayerson has chronicled the most significant stories on the South Fork for Vanity Fair, from the neutron bombshell of the former Hummer magnate Ira Rennert’s 100,000-square-foot Fair Field estate landing in the Sagaponack dunes to the land-grab lawsuit against the centuries-old White farming family in that village.

  •     I don’t know what a wipe warmer is, but it sounds like something I’d like to try.  
                                          

  •     Whiskers, a triangle of pink, a couple of floppy ears: Nosing into your periphery in time for Easter, yet incongruously attuned to an altogether different ancient teacher, comes “Bunny Buddhism: Hopping Along the Path to Enlightenment” (Perigee, $14), Krista Lester’s book of snippets of wisdom to help get you through your day.