Recent Stories: Books

Star Staff
July 13, 2017
Prick up your ears, poetry fans: Grace Schulman will take to the lectern to read at Sunday’s gathering of the Poetry Marathon in Amagansett.

Prick up your ears, poetry fans: Grace Schulman will take to the lectern to read at Sunday’s gathering of the Poetry Marathon in Amagansett. The Springs part-timer not long ago pulled down a Frost Medal from the Poetry Society of America for her distinguished lifetime achievements. A distinguished professor of English at Baruch College, she is the author of numerous collections of poems, most recently “Without a Claim.” She edited “The Poems of Marianne Moore” and in 2010 came out with “First Loves and Other Adventures,” a book of essays on artistic influences and the writing life.

Bryley Williams
July 6, 2017

The Amagansett Library has a packed literary summer planned with an Authors After Hours series that begins Saturday night with Gerard Doyle, an actor and narrator, and continues to mid-August. 

Mr. Doyle, who is the performing arts teacher at the Ross Upper School in East Hampton, has recorded hundreds of audiobooks, including the “Inheritance” series by Christopher Paolini, “Sea of Trolls” by Nancy Farmer, and “The Looking Glass Wars” by Frank Beddor. He won an AudioFile Earphones Award for his first audiobook, “A Star Called Henry,” and has won myriad awards since then.

Mark Segal
July 6, 2017
“Sag Harbor: 100 Years of Film in the Village,” an homage to a century of cinema on Main Street, traces the theater’s history from the silent era to its nearly four-decade tenure as the last independent, single-screen theater on the East End.

“Sag Harbor: 100 Years of Film in the Village,” an homage to a century of cinema on Main Street, came out on Tuesday. Written by Annette Hinkle, former associate editor of The Sag Harbor Express and currently the community news editor of The Shelter Island Reporter, the book traces the theater’s history from the silent era to its nearly four-decade tenure as the last independent, single-screen theater on the East End. 

Evan Harris
July 6, 2017
In “The Whole Thing Together,” set in Wainscott, the young-adult novelist Ann Brashares is back with her suite of strong suits showing.

“The Whole Thing
Together”

Ann Brashares
Delacorte, $18.99

Summer, Wainscott, family weirdness. In “The Whole Thing Together” the young-adult novelist Ann Brashares of “Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” series fame is back with her suite of strong suits showing. 

The book is immediately engaging, fast moving, and appealingly easy to read. All of these hold through the book’s conclusion in spite of a somber fork in the narrative road. It’s light and breezy meets situation tragedy.

Baylis Greene
July 6, 2017

Simon Perchik, Star Black, and Edward Butscher will usher in this summer’s iteration of the Poetry Marathon on Sunday at the East Hampton Town Marine Museum on Bluff Road in Amagansett.

There will be four readings this year, all of them this month. Each starts at 5:30 p.m. and is followed by a reception. The Marine Museum will be open for tours, as well.

Mr. Perchik, a prolific poet who lives in Springs, published his latest collection, “The B Poems,” with Poets Wear Prada at the end of last year. A review in The Star called it a deep exploration of the underworld in verse lacking all artifice.

Laura Wells
June 29, 2017
Ariel Levy's arresting memoir shows her eye for detail, her innate curiosity, and a great essayist's knack for not letting style get in the way of the story.

“The Rules
Do Not Apply”
Ariel Levy
Random House, $27

“To this day I feel comforted and relieved of loneliness, no matter how foreign my surroundings, if I have a pad and a pen.” As much as Ariel Levy’s arresting memoir, “The Rules Do Not Apply,” is about taking bold steps — she discovers Cap T, Cap L True Love when she meets Lucy during a blackout, describing her as a woman who “had the radiant decency of a sunflower” — the real spine of this book is about Ms. Levy’s passion for writing. 

June 22, 2017
Leonard Barkan is a Renaissance man and a Jew who has spent much of the last couple of years in Berlin. Who better to write a book with a title like “Berlin for Jews”?

“Berlin for Jews”
Leonard Barkan
University of  Chicago Press, $27.50

Leonard Barkan is a Renaissance man, in more ways than one. A Princeton professor, he’s also a classics man, an art history man, an archeology man, an architecture man, a man who loves to travel, and a Jew who has spent much of the last couple of years in Berlin.Who better to write a book with a title like “Berlin for Jews”? 

Star Staff
June 22, 2017
George Saunders in Sag, Authors Night tickets on sale, and Rosenblatt's master class

George Saunders in Sag

The Esther Newberg Authors Tea, new this year, will welcome George Saunders to read and talk about his work on Sunday at 11 a.m. at the John Jermain Memorial Library in Sag Harbor. Signing up in advance is a must; the limit is 70 attendees. Mr. Saunders, a widely admired writer of short stories, has a hit on his hands with his first novel, “Lincoln in the Bardo.” The tea was organized by the family and friends of Ms. Newberg to honor her, a village resident, veteran literary agent, and executive vice president of International Creative Management, for her work in publishing.

 

Authors Night Tix

Jackie Pape
June 22, 2017
As summer 2017 is off and running, so are the many authors traveling to the South Fork. Whether they come for work, play, or a little of both, BookHampton will continue to host them at its Main Street, East Hampton, shop.

As summer 2017 is off and running, so are the many authors traveling to the South Fork. Whether they come for work, play, or a little of both, BookHampton will continue to host them at its Main Street, East Hampton, shop. 

Among others, notable authors putting in appearances to read, discuss, answer questions, and sign copies are William Norwich, John Aldridge and Anthony Sosinski, Daphne Merkin, Richard Haass, Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni, and Mike Lupica. 

Baylis Greene
June 15, 2017
A moon-faced orb as regent for the evening, a goodbye to a beloved pair of worn-out sneakers, and a beached baby whale's salvation in new children's books.

“Mr. Moon”

Michael Paraskevas is a good time. As illustrators go, does anyone have more fun? Every page is a party bursting with weirdness, color, and creatures, and then the occasional beacon of sanity, a recognizably rendered human being dropped into the mix, hero or foil, observer or participant, a stand-in for the reader, maybe even for a young Paraskevas himself. 

June 8, 2017
Lawrence Goldstone rescues John Holland, “the father of the modern submarine,” from relative obscurity and places him alongside more well-known American inventors.

“Going Deep”
Lawrence Goldstone
Pegasus Books, $27.95

On Aug. 26, 1905, President Theodore Roosevelt traveled a short distance from his summer home at Sagamore Hill on Long Island’s north shore to where the submarine the Plunger was docked near Oyster Bay. The boat had been scheduled for a presidential inspection to determine if submarines should be added to the American naval fleet. 

Star Staff
June 1, 2017
The Barnes Landing Association will hold its 16th annual Anna Mirabai Lytton writers and artists showcase on June 3 from 2 to 3:30 at the Barnes Landing meetinghouse at the intersection of Barnes Hole and Water’s Edge Roads in Springs.

The Barnes Landing Association will hold its 16th annual Anna Mirabai Lytton writers and artists showcase on June 3 from 2 to 3:30 at the Barnes Landing meetinghouse at the intersection of Barnes Hole and Water’s Edge Roads in Springs. Participating artists and writers are Francine Whitney, Kate Rabinowitz, Dee Slavutin, Valerie King, Meredith Hasemann, Mark Ginsberg, Susan Friend, Paul Ehrlich, Ram­eshwar Das, Fran Castan, Lisa Dick­ler Awano, and Hiroo Dickler Awano.

The event has been named in honor of a student and young writer from Springs — the daughter of Ms. Rabinowitz and Mr. Das — who died in a traffic accident in 2013.

Christopher Walsh
June 1, 2017
From the start, Jann Wenner was daring, lucky, and good.

“50 Years 
of Rolling Stone”

Jann Wenner
Abrams, $65

The last 18 months have seen the death of an inordinate number of rock ’n’ roll musicians. 

May 25, 2017
One of Barney Rosset’s first acquisitions for Grove Press was with an unknown writer named Samuel Beckett, an Irishman who lived in France, wrote in French, and was rejected by French publishers.

“Dear Mr. Beckett”
Barney Rosset
Opus, $32.95

”Barney and I go to the tennis matches. . . . We play games, and we talk politics. We don’t talk literature. I don’t talk literature with nobody.” — Samuel Beckett

May 18, 2017
In “A Legacy of Valor: A History of Lifesaving and Shipwrecks at Montauk,” Henry Osmers writes of how, given the remoteness of the area and its lack of population, it was difficult to help ships that fell victim to storm, fog, or other maritime peril.

“A Legacy of Valor”
Henry Osmers
Outskirts Press, $23.95

Star Staff
May 11, 2017
Writing at the Parrish. A Frost Farm Prize for Caitlin Doyle.

Writing at the Parrish

May 11, 2017
Ryan White captures the carefree nature of 1970s Key West, where Jimmy Buffett launched his career, through rhapsodic passages and interviews detailing bottle-born mischief.

“Jimmy Buffett: A Good Life All the Way”
Ryan White
Touchstone, $26.99

May 4, 2017
Janet Lee Berg’s novel “Rembrandt’s Shadow” is loosely based on wartime experiences of the wealthy Katz family, who exchanged Dutch masterpieces for Jewish lives.

“Rembrandt’s Shadow”
Janet Lee Berg
Post Hill Press, $15

April 27, 2017
Sheila Kohler’s “Once We Were Sisters” is a story of betrayals. Not a thousand pinpricks. A thousand sword thrusts.

“Once We Were Sisters”
Sheila Kohler
Penguin, $16

April 20, 2017
For National Poetry Month, a look at the poems in “Pushcart Prize XLI: Best of the Small Presses."

“Pushcart Prize XLI”
Edited by Bill Henderson
Pushcart Press, $19.95

Kurt Wenzel
April 13, 2017
Alec Baldwin's memoir is more rueful than contentious, and intermittently evocative and wise.

“Nevertheless”
Alec Baldwin
Harper, $28.99

April 6, 2017
The setting for this tale of multiple mysteries is a prosaic but familiar one: Suffolk County.

“What You Break”
Reed Farrel Coleman
G.P. Putnam’s Sons, $27

Star Staff
March 30, 2017

Poetry Readings, Two of ’Em

March 28, 2017
If there is a subtext to Bill Schutt’s latest book, it is to question the origin and the reasonableness of the taboo against consuming other humans.

“Cannibalism”
Bill Schutt
Algonquin Books, $26.95