Recent Stories: Habitat

Abby Jane Brody
August 5, 2014

Purple is the darnedest color. It attracts us like bees to a honeypot. But get it home and it is nearly impossible to find a spot where it fits in. 

After spending entirely too much time on this conundrum I’m coming to the conclusion that purple works well on a small scale or in a large park-like setting. But not in the smaller domestic properties in which most of us live and garden.

Star staff
August 1, 2014

Eco-friendly gardens will be the focus of this year’s Garden as Art tour, an annual benefit for Guild Hall. The event begins on Saturday at 9 a.m. with a continental breakfast at Guild Hall and a panel discussion moderated by Edwina von Gal.

The subject of the talk will be similar in theme to the tour, i.e., landscape care that is chemical and pesticide free. Afterward there will be a book signing by the participants: Sean O’Neill, Stephen Orr, Eric Fleisher, Diane Lewis, and Paul Tukey.

May 27, 2014

The Southampton Historical Museum will hold its annual house tour on Saturday at houses throughout Southampton Village and beyond. Now in its fifth year, the tour will include several houses as well as St. Andrew’s Church of the Dunes, the Thomas Halsey Homestead, and the 1708 House inn, which will also serve refreshments.

Mark Segal
April 29, 2014

    St. Luke’s Episcopal Church’s annual house and garden tour, this year including six private properties in and around the village of East Hampton, will take place on May 10 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The evening before, May 9, from 6:30 to 8:30, a cocktail party will be held at a newly built classic cottage-style house on Ocean Avenue as a fund-raiser for the church’s community outreach programs.

Abby Jane Brody
March 4, 2014
Most people have had their fill of snow this winter, but our gardens would fare much better if they remained covered by a blanket of snow until the jet stream changes and the cycle of freeze-thaw gives way to stable, moderating temperatures.

    Gardeners will understand when I say I was elated last Thursday afternoon when it seemed the snow might actually accumulate. That was not to be. The so-called Sunday-night storm was a bust, too. It has been a week of the worst of all possible worlds for our gardens: temperatures plunged with no renewal of the poor man’s compost, snow.

Amanda M. Fairbanks
October 8, 2013

   Barbara Macklowe has a passion for photography and says it has taken over her life. After retiring from the family’s antiques gallery, she took several trips around the world, honing her picture-taking skills along the way. Self-taught, she learned by doing. She couldn’t put down her camera during two trips to India, one in 2004 and another in 2005, she said, and it changed her “forever.”

Debra Scott
October 8, 2013

   Barbara Feldman, an East Hampton interior designer, has found her calling, and it turns out to be a composite of her previous careers. A former designer of commercial and medical interiors, a real estate agent, and a house stager, she reinvented herself not long ago after analyzing the demographics of the South Fork and realizing that a plethora of young families live here. “They need a different kind of design,” she said.

Evan Harris
October 8, 2013

    My husband planted Jerusalem artichokes in his East Hampton vegetable garden last fall. He ordered them from an online catalog that a friend had recommended. They looked like pieces of ginger root — that light brown color and that gnarled shape. My husband made an area for them along the north side of the garden fence, and then he planted the tubers about three inches down in the ground. He installed a mesh barrier about six inches deep around the area to prevent underground traveling creatures from eating the tubers. And that was it.

Laura Donnelly
August 27, 2013

   Last year, my brothers and I sold our family home: a little 100-year-old pink stucco house at the end of a road, surrounded by a golf course and water. Exquisite. It was a painful time whose time had come. I was ready for a little “city living,” having neighbors close by, restaurants that stayed open year round, and no pop-up shops for twerking tweens. (Sorry, East Hampton Village, but you have become dismal in winter and downright silly in summer.) I made plans to move to Sag Harbor.

Debra Scott
July 18, 2013

    The house is purple. Inside and out: painted cedar planks on the exterior and tongue-in-groove millwork in the interior. The overarching aesthetic is startling given the setting in tall white-pine woods in East Hampton’s Northwest — a setting that prompted the modernist architect Don Chappell to suggest vibrant color for dramatic contrast. At least that’s how it all used to be. Today, if you take a careful look you will find a recent addition that has a calming effect.

Christopher Walsh
July 9, 2013

    In a grove of cedars in the woods of Springs, Marcia Previti and Peter Gumpel have taken architecture into an unexpected, although appropriate, realm: the outdoors.

    The couple, who are architects, have lived in a “raised ranch, split-level, postmodern bungalow” (in their words) for 22 years. In the course of those two-plus decades, they have taken the art and science of constructing buildings and, one could say, turned it inside out, creating a series of outdoor “rooms” filled with surprise.

Abby Jane Brody
July 4, 2013

The seamless integration of house and garden with the landscape is the ideal, even the Holy Grail, of garden and landscape design. Here on the East End a few jewels meet the challenge.

    Recently, I was introduced to a place on the bay in Springs that meets that ideal. Thanks to the Cultural Landscape Foundation, one of a series of garden dialogues throughout the country was held at the home of Bob and Margo Alexander in which Thomas Balsley, a prominent landscape architect who helped create the Alexanders’ garden, spoke about the process.

Carrie Ann Salvi
June 19, 2013
After years of speculation about the project, those with the golden ticket, like in “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” got a glimpse inside a model apartment and a view from the rooftop.

   Cape Advisors flew in the metropolitan press by seaplane last Thursday and welcomed reporters from the local media as well to a penthouse cocktail party at the Bulova Watchcase Factory condominiums. After years of speculation about the project, those with the golden ticket, like “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” got a glimpse inside the model penthouse and a view from the rooftop.

Jennifer Landes
June 11, 2013

    After a sojourn in Southampton last year, the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons’ garden tour, now in its 27th year, returns to East Hampton on June 15. The tour features six private gardens, complimentary admission to the Much Ado About Madoo garden market sale in Sagaponack, and a separate cocktail reception.
    Highlights include the gardens of two landscape designers, Craig James Socia’s Craigmoor property on Accabonac Road and that of Michael Derrig and his wife, Dwyer, on Buell Lane Extension.

Star staff
June 11, 2013

    The Madoo Conservancy is celebrating its 20th birthday with a two-day gardening event that will combine socializing, shopping, and education all in the verdant and captivating environment of Robert Dash’s home and public garden in Sagaponack.

T.E. McMorrow
May 21, 2013

   One person’s trash is another’s treasure was Bryan and Michele Gosman’s mantra as they assembled the pieces of what is now their dream house.

Star staff
May 21, 2013

   Six noted designers and decorators who live or work on the South Fork have staged an unusual showhouse that will open this weekend as a benefit for the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons. They have taken over six rooms in the organization’s thrift shop, on the Montauk Highway in Sagaponack, and decorated them on intriguing themes. Grace Coddington, the creative director of Vogue, is the honorary chairwoman.

Jennifer Landes
May 7, 2013

   Victorian-era houses in Southampton Village are still prevalent, but many have lost their original style and flavor due to a modern preference for a cleaner, more open feeling. At least one Victorian in the village’s downtown, however, maintains its qualities both inside and out with a sensitive renovation that retains its character while accommodating a contemporary lifestyle.

Jennifer Landes
April 26, 2013
Designed from the start to work in tandem with the museum, the grounds will evoke the rural features of the area and the museum structure, which the Swiss architects describe as an “agrarian vernacular shed.”

Is it possible that some people who regularly visit the South Fork are unaware that the Parrish Art Museum has relocated to Water Mill on the site of an old nursery? Not likely.

Still, in the mostly effusive reception the Herzog and de Meuron building has received in the regional, national, and international press since it opened in November, the 15-acre property on which the building sits, designed by Reed Hilderbrand Landscape Architecture in Massachusetts, has been largely overlooked.

Irene Silverman
April 11, 2013
The final piece of a puzzle complicated by warring factions and an acrimonious lawsuit fell into place last Thursday, when an overwhelming number of time-share owners voted to accept an offer from 290 Old Montauk Associates, a corporation headed by a New Jersey developer who invests in distressed real estate with an eye to turning it around and reselling it.

    A few loose ends remain to be tied up, but the long-rumored sale of Gurney’s Inn now seems certain.
    The final piece of a puzzle complicated by warring factions and an acrimonious lawsuit fell into place last Thursday, when an overwhelming number of time-share owners voted to accept an offer from 290 Old Montauk Associates, a corporation headed by a New Jersey developer who invests in distressed real estate with an eye to turning it around and reselling it.

Baylis Greene
February 12, 2013

   The history that runs so deep on the South Fork is matched by a passion for it and, too often, by a willingness to destroy it. For notorious example, Wick’s Tavern in Bridgehampton, once catering to drinkers and gossips at the same Main Street intersection as two historic houses that made it to the 21st century, the Nathaniel Rogers House and the Bull’s Head Inn. Wick’s Tavern dated from the end of the 17th century yet was leveled in 1941 so a gas station could rise in its place. (It’s gone now, too, and won’t be missed.)

December 24, 2012

By Ellen T. White

Carissa Katz
November 19, 2012

   Even if you can’t put a name to the Montauk Association houses, also known as the Seven Sisters, you have probably seen and admired them from afar while driving away from the Montauk Light. Look southwest from the highway and you see a collection of just-right-size Shingle Style cottages, each set on a little rise in the moorlands, surrounded by acres and acres of wild woods and tangled underbrush ending at the bluffs.